<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 9:03 AM, Zai Lynch <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:I_really_needed_a_new_mailbox@gmx.de">I_really_needed_a_new_mailbox@gmx.de</a>></span> wote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Can you already tell something about the initial two questions? The BSD vs. MIT license and recommended resources?</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Ooops...sorry, shiny object distracted me.</div><div></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">
<div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204);margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex"><div><div class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204);margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex"><div><div><ul><li>You write that you're releasing your jasonwidget-python under a "BSD-style license". The pywikipediabot is released under an MIT license. Do you know if that's a conflict in any way? E.g. when I'd like to offer the pywikipediabot people to add the UI to their sourceforge project?<br>
</li></ul></div></div></blockquote></div></div></blockquote></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>No conflict at all. MIT and BSD (3-clause) are almost identical, and both are extremely liberal licenses. jsonwidget is 3-clause BSD. I say "BSD-style" only because the term "BSD" doesn't appear anywhere in the license after the necessary substitution is done.</div>
<div></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><div class="im"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204);margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex">
<div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204);margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex"><div><div><ul><li>I downloaded a copy of "Dive into Python" ( <a href="http://diveintopython.org/" target="_blank">http://diveintopython.org/</a> ) which was recommended on a Mashable blog post once. Are there other related sources that you'd recommend for reading in order to get an easy start? Remember that  like written before  my background is rather limited. I only know basics about theoretical computer science (this "formal grammar" stuff), some dusty and basic knowledge in Pascal (Kylix) from 7 years ago and well... LSL.</li>
</ul></div></div></blockquote></div></div></blockquote></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I've heard good things about "Dive into Python", but I don't have direct experience with it. It sounds like a reasonable way to learn Python. I learned Python mostly via online sources, but that was after having learned Perl from "Programming Perl" (aka "the camel book"), so my learning experience was a lot of "I know how to do X in Perl....how do I do it in Python?"</div>
<div><br></div><div>Having said that, I just went to the <a href="http://diveintopython.org">diveintopython.org</a>, and noticed that at least half a dozen of the links in the TOC are purple for me, so I must have been hitting it via Google and not realizing it.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Rob</div><div><br></div></div>